Student took his own life as he was 'haunted' by his sister's death

University student, 21, whose 17-year-old sister hanged herself took his own life ten months later because he was ‘haunted’ by claims paramedic could have saved her, inquest hears

  • Quinn Beadle, 17, took her own life in December 2018 after battling depression 
  • Older brother Dyllon Milburn was unable to cope with grief of losing his sister 
  • He took his own life two months short of the first anniversary of Quinn’s death 
  • For confidential support call Samaritans on 116123 or visit a Samaritans branch 

A university student whose teenage sister hanged herself took his own life less than a year later because he was ‘haunted’ by claims a paramedic could have saved her life, an inquest heard.

Dyllon Milburn, 21, was already devastated over the death of Quinn Beadle, 17, but then learned of an investigation into claims the ambulanceman called to the scene had pronounced her dead ‘too quickly’ without making any attempt to revive her.

As enquiries continued into the tragedy, Dyllon, from Shildon, Co Durham, who had taken a year off college became tormented by what his family called ‘a wicked cover up.’

Just ten months after his sister’s death and less than a month after reading the report about the paramedic’s conduct, he was found hanged in the back garden at his student digs in Manchester.

Quinn Beadle, 17, (pictured, right) was found hanging from a tree yards from her home in December 2018. Her brother Dyllon, 21 (pictured, left) was unable to cope after her suicide and took his own life two months short of the first anniversary of her death

Dyllon, 21, (pictured above) took his own life 10 months after his little sister Quinn’s death. His parents say the world was ‘too cruel’ for him after her suicide


Dyllon Milburn (left) ‘didn’t realise’ sister Quinn Beadle (right) was his best friend until after her death, their mother said

The tragic scenario began in December 2018 when Quinn – described as a ‘generous, kind 17-year-old with boundless energy’ – was found hanged from a tree near her home following a battle against depression.

Initially the death was treated as an ‘open and closed case’ and Manchester Metropolitan University undergraduate Dyllon and his parents set up a charity to help other families grieving by the suicide of loved ones.

But unbeknownst to them, the North East Ambulance Service had begun an internal investigation after it emerged the solo paramedic called to the scene told two police officers attempting CPR: ‘You can stop now, she’s gone’ after simply looking into Quinn’s eyes with a pencil torch.

In April 2019, an inquest into Quinn’s death was due to be held, but was then delayed after Dyllon and his family learned of the investigation into the unnamed paramedic – known only as GW.

At the Manchester hearing his mother Tracey Beadle said: ‘After Quinn died, we set up the charity, Quinn’s Retreat, to help other people who have been bereaved by suicide and provide them with short breaks.

‘Dyllon was the leading force in setting the charity up and was a very proud trustee and we put on a charity event. We turned the place where Quinn took her life into a little garden for the community.

‘But Dyllon then read the independent report into Quinn’s death and he told me it was the things that he read in the report was haunting him.

‘The report showed the wrongdoing of the paramedic who was the first on the scene the night we lost Quinn. The report said Quinn had been left face down in the mud and Dyllon couldn’t get it out of his mind.

‘He couldn’t believe anyone would do that to his little sister and he kept coming back to that. He said he didn’t realise Quinn was his best friend until we lost her. It was eating him up inside that someone could do that to her.

‘At the time when we were preparing for Quinn’s inquest, we didn’t know anything about what had happened to her and we thought it would be open and closed and we only found out two days before the inquest that anything had gone wrong on the evening she died.’

The siblings, pictured here as children, were described by their parents Tracey and David Beadle as ‘special’ and ‘amazing children’

The tragic scenario began in December 2018 when Quinn (pictured with her brother as children) – described as a ‘generous, kind 17-year-old with boundless energy’ – was found hanged from a tree near her home following a battle against depression

A coroner said: ‘Dyllon (right) was a loving person and the leading force of the charity set up in Quinn’s (left) memory to assist those who have gone through similar events’

An independent report was ordered after her inquest was delayed and it was later produced on September 23, 2019.

Dyllon hanged himself on October 8. He himself had a history of anxiety and depression and had been prescribed anti depressants.

His mother added: ‘We were messaging the previous evening. At the end of every phone call, he said he loved us. If you were having a text conversation, he would normally say, ‘I love you lots.’

‘He was on and off his medication. I knew that he was feeling really low and suicide may have been on his mind. I did discuss it with him. I tried unsuccessfully to get him to go into counselling. He just said he wasn’t ready for it.

‘Dyllon was amazing. He was larger than life. He was so kind and caring. He loved the world and everything in it. He would always tell you that he loved you. He would give you the best hugs. He was just wonderful.’

Recording a conclusion of suicide Manchester coroner Zak Golombeck said: ‘There were things in Dyllon’s life that were extremely hard to deal with – most notably the death and the circumstances around the death of his sister, who he loved dearly and they were extremely close.

‘Dyllon was a loving person and the leading force of the charity set up in Quinn’s memory to assist those who have gone through similar events to what Dyllon and his family went through. This shows the type of person that Dyllon was.

‘However, he struggled with his depression despite having a close network of friends and family around him. A report was commissioned into the death of Quinn and this had a profound effect on him particularly as a result of their close relationship as siblings, but also because of the nature of what the report told him. As Tracey put it, it ‘haunted him’.’

When the inquest into Quinn’s death was heard in October 2020, a coroner recorded a narrative verdict saying although the ambulanceman had failed to used a defibrillator upon her, there was a ‘minute chance’ she could have been saved. 

The ambulance service has since apologised.

  • For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for details.

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