Prince Andrew's legal team will be allowed to review Epstein deal

Prince Andrew’s legal team will be allowed to review Jeffrey Epstein and Virginia Giuffre deal which his lawyers hope will shield him from US sex abuse lawsuit

  • Virginia Giuffre, 38,  is launching a civil case against Prince Andrew in the US
  • She claims he sexually abused her two decades ago while she was underage
  • Prince Andrew, who is not facing criminal charges, ‘categorically’ denies claims 
  • US District Judge has now granted access for Duke’s lawyers to a previous deal
  • The 2009 deal is between Ms Giuffre and the late US financier Jeffrey Epstein
  • Lawyers for Prince Andrew believe deal will shield Duke from US civil action 

Prince Andrew’s legal team will be allowed to review a previously secret settlement which his lawyers hope will shield him from a sex abuse lawsuit in the US.

A US District Judge yesterday granted permission for the Duke of York’s lawyers to receive a copy of a confidential agreement between the late financier Jeffrey Epstein and Virginia Giuffre.

Ms Giuffre, 38, is launching a US civil case against Prince Andrew, accusing him of sexually abusing her two decades ago.

The 61-year-old royal, who is not facing any criminal charges, ‘categorically’ denies Ms Giuffre’s claims against him.

A US District Judge yesterday granted permission of the Duke of York’s (pictured in April this year) lawyers to receive a copy of a confidential agreement between the late financier Jeffrey Epstein and Virginia Giuffre

Ms Giuffre (pictured) is launching a US civil case against Prince Andrew, accusing him of sexually abusing a woman two decades ago, when she was underage

Ms Giuffre (allegedly pictured here in 2001 with Prince Andrew) is accusing the prince of having sex with her knowing she had been trafficked by Epstein and she was underage. She alleged this took place at the London home of Epstein’s longtime associate Ghislaine Maxwell 

Sarah Ferguson ‘is likely to be subpoenaed’ if Prince Andrew fails to get Virginia Roberts’ case thrown out of court in New York 

Relatives, aides and even ex-wife Sarah Ferguson could be forced into courtrooms to answer questions about Prince Andrew should the Duke’s sex abuse case get the green light to go ahead in New York later this month.  

The Duke is privately preparing to hand over ‘personal documents’ in an intrusive process that could see relatives and Royal aides dragged into proceedings, reports the Telegraph. 

That could include ex-wife Sarah Ferguson, who has remained fiercely loyal to the embattled Duke, who is likely to face subpoena if Andrew fails to get his case thrown out. 

Royal insiders fear any such move would be a ‘pretty traumatic’ process that Andrew’s lawyers would only ever enter with ‘due caution’, the Sunday Telegraph reports.

The Duke has until October 29 to respond to the civil suit, with a remote hearing scheduled for November 3.

Ms Giuffre, who has also accused Epstein of abuse, signed a settlement deal with the financier in 2009 as part of a Florida state case – to which the duke was not a party.

The deal between her and Esptein, who died in his jail cell in 2019 while awaiting trial for sex trafficking charges, has remained confidential.

Epstein’s estate had agreed to let Prince Andrew’s legal team review the legal document, but court approval was needed. 

At a hearing in Manhatten yesterday, District Judge Loretta Preska granted the approval. 

At a hearing last month, Andrew Brettler, a lawyer for the prince, told the judge overseeing Ms Giuffre’s lawsuit that he believed the agreement ‘absolves our client from any and all liability.’ 

During the first pre-trial hearing of the case last month, he said: ‘There has been a settlement agreement that the plaintiff has entered into in a prior action that releases the duke and others from any and all potential liability.’ 

However, David Boies, one of the lawyers representing Ms Giuffre, said in a court filing last month that he believed the settlement was ‘irrelevant’ to her case against the prince.

He said: ‘Although we believe that the release is irrelevant to the case against Prince Andrew, now that service has been accepted and the case is proceeding to a determination on the merits, we believe that counsel for Prince Andrew have a right to review the release and to make whatever arguments they believe appropriate based on it.’ 

Mr Brettler said in an email he expects to receive the agreement soon from Ms Giuffre’s lawyers. 

Ms Giuffre is accusing the prince of having sex with her knowing she had been trafficked by Epstein and she was underage.

She alleged this took place at the London home of Epstein’s longtime associate Ghislaine Maxwell.


At a hearing last month, Andrew Brettler (pictured right), a lawyer for the prince, told the judge overseeing Ms Giuffre’s lawsuit that he believed the agreement ‘absolves our client from any and all liability.’  However, David Boies (pictured left), one of the lawyers representing Ms Giuffre, said in a court filing last month that he believed the settlement was ‘irrelevant’ to her case against the prince.

She also said the prince abused her at Epstein’s mansion in Manhattan, and on Epstein’s private island in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

She claims she was trafficked by Epstein, the duke’s former friend, to have sex with Andrew when she was aged 17 and a minor under US law. 

She is seeking unspecified damages, but there is speculation the sum could be in the millions of dollars. 

Andrew faces an October 29 deadline to formally respond to Giuffre’s lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages.

Epstein, a registered sex offender, killed himself at age 66 in a Manhattan jail in August 2019 while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

Maxwell has pleaded not guilty to helping recruit and groom underage girls for Epstein to abuse. Her trial in Manhattan is scheduled for November 29. 

It comes as it was yesterday reported that relatives, aides and even ex-wife Sarah Ferguson could be forced into courtrooms to answer questions about Prince Andrew should the Duke’s sex abuse case get the green light to go ahead in New York later this month. 

The Duke is privately preparing to hand over ‘personal documents’ in an intrusive process that could see relatives and Royal aides dragged into proceedings, reports the Telegraph. 

That could include ex-wife Sarah Ferguson, who has remained fiercely loyal to the embattled Duke, who is likely to face subpoena if Andrew fails to get his case thrown out. 

Prince Andrew, 61, is privately preparing to hand over ‘personal documents’ in an intrusive process that could see relatives, Royal aides and even ex-wife Sarah Ferguson dragged into his legal proceedings. Pictured together in 2019


The Queen (pictured left, at the Balmoral Cricket Pavilion in Scotland yesterday) is spending millions of pounds funding Prince Andrew’s (right) fight against sex abuse allegations, reports say

Royal insiders fear any such move would be a ‘pretty traumatic’ process that Andrew’s lawyers would only ever enter with ‘due caution’, the Sunday Telegraph reports.

The Duke has until October 29 to respond to the civil suit, with a remote hearing scheduled for November 3.

The news comes after one of the most dramatic cases of royal redemption after Prince’s ex-wife Sarah Ferguson accompanied him to Balmoral in August as senior members of the Royal Family met for the first time since the civil suit was filed.

The Duchess has also said she is ‘100 per cent’ certain that Andrew is telling the truth about his part in the scandal surrounding convicted paedophile Jeffrey Epstein. 

She told the Financial Times: ‘I want him [Andrew] to come through this. I want him to win.’

When asked why she was sure of his probity, she replied: ‘No question. I know everything about him. I think he is an extraordinary person.’ 

The news comes as it was revealed the Queen is spending millions of pounds funding Prince Andrew’s fight against sex abuse allegations.

Royal courtiers are said to expect the final legal bill to run into millions as the civil case against Andrew lingers for months or even years.

And a potential settlement or damages payout would cost millions more on top of the overall bill.

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