Firefighters rescue a SLOTH clinging to a telegraph pole in Panama

Hang in there! Moment firefighters rescue a SLOTH clinging to a telegraph pole in Panama

  • A video shows firefighters rescuing a sloth that had climbed up a telegraph pole
  • Sloth is seen clinging to the top of the pole as the firefighter tries to pull it away
  • The rescue took place using a crane in Alcalde Diaz, Panama on January 13

This is the moment firefighters rescued a sloth that was clinging to a telegraph pole in Panama. 

The rescue took place in the township of Alcalde Diaz in the Republic of Panama on Wednesday, January 13.

In the video shared by the National Police of Panama, the sloth is seen hanging onto the utility pole as the firefighter tries to pull it away.

A video shows firefighters rescuing a sloth that had climbed up a telegraph pole in Alcalde Diaz, Panama on Wednesday and was clinging to the top

After a few tugs, the firefighter manages to separate the reluctant sloth from the pole. 

As the crane begins to lower them back to ground, the firefighter holds the sloth at arms length as the sloth grasps onto the air looking for something to hold onto.

The rescue operation was successful thanks to the joint effort of the National Police of Panama, the Panama Fire Department, and the power company Electron SA.   

National Police of Panama did not state where the sloth was taken afterwards.

The video of the rescue of the sloth was shared online on January 13 and has almost 2,000 views.

Sloths of several varieties found in Panama, including the brown-throated three-fingered sloths found on the mainland. 

In the video shared by the National Police of Panama, the firefighter manages to separate the reluctant sloth from the pole after a few tugs and is lowered to the ground using a crane

They are considered to be the world’s slowest mammal, and move at an extremely slow speed of 0.15 mph.

It would take them about a minute to climb only 6 to 8 feet however, they can move much faster in water.

Sloths spend up to 15 to 20 hours per day on trees and it can spend 90 per cent of its life hanging upside down.

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