Chinese waterfall 'flows backwards' in Typhoon Hagupit

Incredible moment Chinese waterfall ‘flows backwards’ in Typhoon Hagupit as high winds and heavy rains wreak havoc in the country

  • Strong gales pushed the 623ft tall waterfall against its natural trajectory today
  • The sight occurred after Typhoon Hagupit made landfall with gusts of 85mph
  • Heavy rains and high winds battered Zhejiang province on China’s eastern coast 
  • Over 380,000 people had to be evacuated due to the weather, state media said

Residents in China have been stunned to see a waterfall appearing to flow backwards as Typhoon Hagupit battered their hometown.

The tropical storm brought winds of up to 136.8 kilometres (85 miles) per hour at its centre when it made landfall in Zhejiang province in the early hours.

More than 380,000 people had been evacuated before heavy rains and high winds wreaked havoc on the country’s eastern coast.


The Yandang Mountain waterfall in eastern China’s Zhejiang appeared to run upwards this morning (left). The 623ft tall attraction (right) is one of the four major waterfalls in China

Hagupit, the fourth typhoon of this year, landed at around 3:30am in Leqing, a prefecture-city with just over 1.3million residents. This satellite image taken on August 3 and released by NASA shows Typhoon Hagupit over Taiwan (center left) before its landfall in mainland China

Hagupit, the fourth typhoon of this year, landed at around 3:30am in Leqing, a prefecture-city with just over 1.3million residents.

At noon, the tropical storm had winds of up to 108 kilometres (67 miles) per hour and was moving north at around 25 kilometres (16 miles) per hour, China’s National Meteorological Center said.

The Zhejiang meteorological authority has issued emergency typhoon warnings to towns and cities across the province, which borders Shanghai on the south.

Local weather officials predicted high winds with gusts of up to 125.6 kilometres (78 miles) per hour in the eastern regions. Heavy rainstorms were forecast throughout the day. 


Footage released by Chinese video outlet Pear shows trees wrecked by high winds and streets inundated by floodwaters in the city of Wenzhou hours after typhoon Hagupit made landfall


The Zhejiang meteorological authority has issued emergency typhoon warnings to towns and cities across the province. Local officials had relocated 381,375 people by 10pm last night

The Yandang Mountain Waterfall, one of the four major waterfalls in China, was a sight to behold this morning.

Footage released by state-run Zhejiang Daily shows the 190-metre-tall (623-foot-tall) attraction seemingly running upwards as strong gales pushed the water against its natural trajectory. 

No major destruction or injuries have been reported. State broadcaster CCTV showed trees toppled in the Zhejiang city of Yuhuan. 

The tropical storm brought winds of up to 136.8 kilometres (85 miles) per hour at its centre when it made landfall. Pictured, a woman walks in heavy rain brought by Hagupit in Taipei

In the major Chinese manufacturing centre of Wenzhou, authorities reported evacuating 200,000 people to shelters and recalling more than 6,000 fishing boats to port. Pictured, boats are moored to take shelter in southeastern China’s Fujian Province on Monday

Independent video news outlet Pear shows cars driving on roads submerged in floodwaters and residents being carried out of their homes. 

The Zhejiang authorities had relocated 381,375 people by 10pm last night ahead of the typhoon’s landfall, reported state-run Xinhua.

In the major Zhejiang manufacturing centre of Wenzhou, authorities reported evacuating 200,000 people to shelters and recalling more than 6,000 fishing boats to port. Waves along the coast were reported at heights of 4.2 meters (14 feet).

A man crosses the street during a shower brought on by Typhoon Hagupit in Taipei on Monday

Traffic moves during a shower brought on by Typhoon Hagupit in Taipei, Taiwan, on Monday

This year’s typhoon season has been relatively mild in China. 

However, the country’s major river systems have been dealing with what state media called ‘catastrophic flooding’ since June due to torrential rains.

The adverse weather condition has caused scores of deaths, forced around 2million people to be evacuated and led to more than 49billion yuan (£5.3billion) in damage.

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