Heatstroke symptoms: Anhidrosis is the peculiar warning sign indicating risk – what is it

Jacqueline Jossa shares concerns about heatstroke

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Heatstroke is a form of hyperthermia which occurs when the body temperature is elevated dramatically. The condition is a medical emergency with the possibility of being fatal if not promptly and properly treated.

Heatstroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs.

Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young individuals too.

Experiencing a lack of sweat known as anhidrosis could be a symptom you’re experiencing heatstroke and should not be ignored.

Anhidrosis is a condition in which the sweat glands don’t function as they should to remove heat and cool the body down.

An overheated body can be a dangerous situation and even possibly life-threatening.

Health experts warn that if you or someone you know notice a lack of sweat very little despite the hot weather it could be heatstroke.

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According to WebMD, signs of heatstroke may include:

  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness and light-headedness
  • Lack of sweating despite the heat
  • Red, hot, and dry skin
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Behavioural changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

Causes

The body normally generates heat as a result of metabolism and is usually able to dissipate the heat by radiation of heat through the skin or by evaporation of sweat, explained Medicine Net.

The health site added: “However, in extreme heat, high humidity, or vigorous physical exertion under the sun, the body may not be able to sufficiently dissipate the heat and the body temperature rises, sometimes up to 106 F (41.1 C) or higher.

“Another cause of heatstroke is dehydration.

“A dehydrated person may not be able to sweat fast enough to dissipate heat, which causes the body temperature to rise.”

Treatment

If someone has heat exhaustion or heatstroke, the NHS advises following these four steps:

Move them to a cool place.

Get them to lie down and raise their feet slightly.

Get them to drink plenty of water. Sports or rehydration drinks are OK.

Cool their skin – spray or sponge them with cool water and fan them or use cold packs around the armpits or neck.

If experiencing fast breathing, confusion, loss of consciousness, or no response; call 999 wans the national health body.
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